23 4 / 2014

youonlyliveonce92:

ambelle:

postwhitesociety:

walkingthenarrowway:

sailorfuckshit:

arabellesicardi:

Source.

shout out to all the black english majors who already knew this

goodness gracious.

shoutout to us, indeed.

Pours one out

Welll

(via freshmouthgoddess)

23 4 / 2014

theuppitynegras:

nezua:

startledoctopus:

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

plansfornigel:

sadurdaynight:

female-only:

plansfornigel:

and these are the men women are suppose to call when raped. what is this rape culture you speak of ?

this makes me so mad not every fucking cop is a rapist 

When Cops Rape … and Nothing Happens

“Police sexual misconduct is common, and anyone who maintains it isn’t doesn’t get it,” says retired Seattle police chief Norm Stamper, author of the book Breaking Rank. Since no one is investing resources in learning how many victims are out there, we’re left with estimates and news accounts. As part of a 2008 study, former police officer Tim Maher, a criminologist at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, asked 20 police chiefs whether police sexual misconduct was a problem; 18 responded in the affirmative. The 13 chiefs willing to offer estimates thought an average of 19 percent of cops were involved—if correct, that translates to more than 150,000 police officers nationwide. An informal effort by the Cato Institute in 2010 to track the number of police sexual-misconduct cases just in news stories counted 618 complaints nationwide that year, 354 of which involved forcible nonconsensual sexual activity like sexual assault or sexual battery.

Police Sergeant Doubled as Serial Rapist

It was nothing short of a nightmare — a man obsessively tracking women, sneaking into their homes, assaulting them, and forcing them to perform a bizarre “cleansing” ritual that washed away any hint of evidence from their bodies. Bloomington, Ill., Police Detective Clay Wheeler spent two years pursuing the first serial rapist in his town’s memory.

“I’ve seen more brutal things, more violent things, but some of the things that happened and what he would say and tell these girls as he’s assaulting them, and I mean, I get chills. It just disgusts me,” he said.

According to the 3rd Quarter Report of The National Police Misconduct Statistics and Reporting Project, police officers were accused of sexual assault at a rate of 79 per 100,000 law enforcement personal. The rate of accusations for the general public is 28.7 per 100,000 general public. When corrected for gender these numbers tell us that there are 1.5 times more accusations of sexual assualt among male law enforcement officers than among the general male population. The fact that rapists seem to be concentrated among a group of armed individuals who have the purported authority to detain and arrest other individuals should be more than a little alarming for even the most prolific police bootlicker. In just the last month, several stories of officers committing disgusting crimes have been in the news.

and these are the people supposedly “helping” sex workers; these are the people with the power to “rescue” us.  

The fact that accusations are higher for officers than for the general populations makes me worry that rates of offense are MUCH higher from officers than the general population, since being assaulted by an officer is a strong disincentive against making an accusation, all other rape culture factors aside…

Cops.

welp

(via apparentlyaries)

23 4 / 2014

dynastylnoire:

bitteroreo:

duggygene:

Never really noticed till now.

Lupe made this I’m sure.

Clearly there is ankh craft afoot

dynastylnoire:

bitteroreo:

duggygene:

Never really noticed till now.

Lupe made this I’m sure.

Clearly there is ankh craft afoot

(via apparentlyaries)

23 4 / 2014

pickpants-maemae:

Guys this picture is so important to me. Sometimes i back out of cosplaying a character because im worried people will judge me or shame me for doing it because im black. Im constantly worried people wont take my cosplays seriously because im just a black girl dressing up as iconic white characters. And sometimes that fear makes me feel like I shouldnt do it, like cosplaying isnt for me and I shouldnt go to cons.
But meeting this little girl made me understand how important it is to show my love for characters even if they arent my race. This little girl came up to me and asked for a picture at LexCon, and I almost cried. She came up to me the ONLY black Harley in a sea of perfectly “accurate” white Harleys. And I was so happy she did, and so happy I was there. Im glad I chose to cosplay a character I love, and to be there representing black cosplayers, because now this little girl might have a little bit more confidence in herself. Maybe my being there helped this little girl see that even girls like her can be geeky and cosplay whoever they want.
I really hope so. I know this made me feel more confident. And this is a picture im gonna treasure forever!

pickpants-maemae:

Guys this picture is so important to me. Sometimes i back out of cosplaying a character because im worried people will judge me or shame me for doing it because im black. Im constantly worried people wont take my cosplays seriously because im just a black girl dressing up as iconic white characters. And sometimes that fear makes me feel like I shouldnt do it, like cosplaying isnt for me and I shouldnt go to cons.

But meeting this little girl made me understand how important it is to show my love for characters even if they arent my race. This little girl came up to me and asked for a picture at LexCon, and I almost cried. She came up to me the ONLY black Harley in a sea of perfectly “accurate” white Harleys. And I was so happy she did, and so happy I was there. Im glad I chose to cosplay a character I love, and to be there representing black cosplayers, because now this little girl might have a little bit more confidence in herself. Maybe my being there helped this little girl see that even girls like her can be geeky and cosplay whoever they want.

I really hope so. I know this made me feel more confident. And this is a picture im gonna treasure forever!

(via cosplayingwhileblack)

23 4 / 2014

pickpants-maemae:

Guys this picture is so important to me. Sometimes i back out of cosplaying a character because im worried people will judge me or shame me for doing it because im black. Im constantly worried people wont take my cosplays seriously because im just a black girl dressing up as iconic white characters. And sometimes that fear makes me feel like I shouldnt do it, like cosplaying isnt for me and I shouldnt go to cons.
But meeting this little girl made me understand how important it is to show my love for characters even if they arent my race. This little girl came up to me and asked for a picture at LexCon, and I almost cried. She came up to me the ONLY black Harley in a sea of perfectly “accurate” white Harleys. And I was so happy she did, and so happy I was there. Im glad I chose to cosplay a character I love, and to be there representing black cosplayers, because now this little girl might have a little bit more confidence in herself. Maybe my being there helped this little girl see that even girls like her can be geeky and cosplay whoever they want.
I really hope so. I know this made me feel more confident. And this is a picture im gonna treasure forever!

pickpants-maemae:

Guys this picture is so important to me. Sometimes i back out of cosplaying a character because im worried people will judge me or shame me for doing it because im black. Im constantly worried people wont take my cosplays seriously because im just a black girl dressing up as iconic white characters. And sometimes that fear makes me feel like I shouldnt do it, like cosplaying isnt for me and I shouldnt go to cons.

But meeting this little girl made me understand how important it is to show my love for characters even if they arent my race. This little girl came up to me and asked for a picture at LexCon, and I almost cried. She came up to me the ONLY black Harley in a sea of perfectly “accurate” white Harleys. And I was so happy she did, and so happy I was there. Im glad I chose to cosplay a character I love, and to be there representing black cosplayers, because now this little girl might have a little bit more confidence in herself. Maybe my being there helped this little girl see that even girls like her can be geeky and cosplay whoever they want.

I really hope so. I know this made me feel more confident. And this is a picture im gonna treasure forever!

(via cosplayingwhileblack)

23 4 / 2014

mimicryisnotmastery:

sapphrikah:

butteredveggies:

itsnosecretimanangel:

alphets:

This used to come on Disney.

Lmao

Bruh

woooooooord lmao

tv used to be real

(Source: afirahs)

23 4 / 2014

dont you love that feeling where you and your best friend are just with each other laughing so hard at something so simple and you can’t breathe and its just feels like the whole world just goes in slow motion and you just feel pure happiness and you just are so full of brightness and everything is funny and you feel like everything is going to be okay and anything is possible 

(Source: floricawild, via sonofcinder)

23 4 / 2014

eoliveson:

Annnnd this belongs on here for reasons.

(Source: theyellowbrickroad, via kessaris)

22 4 / 2014

m45c:

being black and putting on your white voice at the drop of a dime is akin to being bilingual

(via apparentlyaries)

22 4 / 2014

"

Once hip-hop culture is ubiquitous, it is also invisible. Once it’s everywhere, it is nowhere. What once offered resistance to mainstream culture (it was part of the larger tapestry, spooky-action style, but it pulled at the fabric) is now an integral part of the sullen dominant. Not to mention the obvious backlash conspiracy paranoia: Once all of black music is associated with hip-hop, then Those Who Wish to Squelch need only squelch one genre to effectively silence an entire cultural movement.

And that’s what it’s become: an entire cultural movement, packed into one hyphenated adjective. These days, nearly anything fashioned or put forth by black people gets referred to as “hip-hop,” even when the description is a poor or pointless fit. “Hip-hop fashion” makes a little sense, but even that is confusing: Does it refer to fashions popularized by hip-hop musicians, like my Lego heart pin, or to fashions that participate in the same vague cool that defines hip-hop music? Others make a whole lot of nonsense: “Hip-hop food”? “Hip-hop politics”? “Hip-hop intellectual”? And there’s even “hip-hop architecture.” What the hell is that? A house you build with a Hammer?

"

Questlove in “How Hip-Hop Failed Black America” (via reichsstadt)

PREACH QUEST!

(via dynastylnoire)

(via jessehimself)

22 4 / 2014

brockdion:

This is not the fail you are looking for….

brockdion:

This is not the fail you are looking for….

(via apparentlyaries)

22 4 / 2014

askmeifimadalek:

bofurthebrodwarf:

zetterbergs:

nelkhael:

Throne of Games.

#lies down

I love how terrified that girl looks

"quick becky if we’re rly quiet we can get away"

askmeifimadalek:

bofurthebrodwarf:

zetterbergs:

nelkhael:

Throne of Games.

#lies down

I love how terrified that girl looks

"quick becky if we’re rly quiet we can get away"

(via apparentlyaries)

22 4 / 2014

22 4 / 2014

(Source: babbleon, via littleblackmaps)

22 4 / 2014

brigidkeely:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Popular media portrays men patronizing women constantly & it’s considered neutral, but a woman patronizing a man is enough to flip people into incandescent rage. Not saying that’s what OP is feeling, but a woman patronizing a man is definitely a hot trigger.

I also want to point out that throwing and breaking things is one of the ways many domestic abusers (statistically likely to be men trying to intimidate/control/harm women) exert dominance and threaten & control their partners. There is nothing like a display of violence and destruction to remind a person that said violence and destruction could be visited upon their person, you know? So there is ABSOLUTELY a power differential at play here, even if they aren’t romantically/sexually involved and even if the writers didn’t intend for there to be. So Joan responding in kind, in a calm demonstrative way, is a way of her taking control of a charged situation and pointing out that yes, he’s acting like a childish dick throwing a temper tantrum and she isn’t going to let that slide/excuse him/clean up his mess for him.

(Source: elementarymydearworld, via warcrimenancydrew)